Trivializing the Islamist Menace

“More people die in the bathtub than from Islamist attacks.” Therefore, … what? How we understand the “terrorist threat” is critical to defining a sound policy for addressing the problem. Yet there’s something deeply, dangerously wrong in the way many of us think of the threat. That’s manifest not only in the prevailing view, but also, especially, in the outlook of some of its fiercest critics. Continue reading.

 
 
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Journo on Capitol Hill: What Justice Demands Launch Event

A Capitol Hill launch event marked the publication of ARI senior fellow Elan Journo’s latest book, What Justice Demands: America and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

The July event, cosponsored by the Middle East Forum and the Ayn Rand Institute, was aimed primarily at congressional staffers, and it featured talks by Daniel Pipes, a scholar and the president of the Middle East Forum; Rep. Bill Johnson of Ohio; and Rep. Ron DeSantis of Florida…. Read on.

Never-Before-Seen Ayn Rand Commentary on Politics | New Ideal

The just-published A New Textbook of Americanism: The Politics of Ayn Rand presents Rand’s little-known 1946 essay “Textbook of Americanism” and never-before-seen commentary on issues in political philosophy. Building on Rand’s philosophic thought, the book also features new essays from Objectivist scholars and writers exploring further aspects of the actual nature of Americanism.

Read on.

Ayn Rand’s Distinctive View on International Affairs | New Ideal

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The range of Ayn Rand’s commentary on cultural-political issues was sweeping. You can see that, for example, in some of the topics she explored in her public lectures at the Ford Hall Forum: from the philosophic meaning of Woodstock and the moon landing, to the ecology movement and the moral significance of the Catholic Church’s views on contraception; from the nature of laissez-faire capitalism and freedom of speech, to the military draft and the Vietnam war.

I’ve often revisited her commentary on foreign policy and international relations, partly because — just as in her analysis of economic, political and cultural issues — there are enduring philosophical lessons with application today. It’s an area of her thought that I hope scholars will delve into.

So I was pleased to read a recent article, “Fostering liberty in international relations theory: the case of Ayn Rand,” by Edwin van de Haar in the academic journal International Politics. It’s encouraging to see academic work on Rand that takes her seriously.

Read on.